The Tool Tray Debate, and a Quick Retrofit

Tool tray or not tool tray? That is the question. Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer the chisels and squares of outrageous clutter, or to take arms against a sea of disarray, and by opposing, end it?

I hear just as much debate about whether or not to put a tool tray on your bench as I do about the perfect-final-last-word-system for cutting dovetails (pins first, BTW. Don’t ask.).  When I built the Roubo du Garage, I decided against the tool tray – I wanted the flat real estate of the benchtop, didn’t want to change the dimensions to make the bench too wide, and didn’t like the fiddly reversible tool trays in the center of the bench that I’ve seen in some designs.

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BUT… recent work became frustrating. Chisels, squares, marking knives, pencils, mallets. Everything seemed to get in the way at the wrong moment. Taking things out of the cabinet one at a time and trying to put them back to avoid clutter on the bench didn’t work even a little bit.

So, I decided to make a removable tool tray on the left end of the bench. I don’t use a planing stop at the end, I use the inset planing stop (visible in the photos).  For wider pieces, I have a thin stop that clamps into the face vise and works across the bench.  The tray is just scrap plywood, two threaded inserts, and two knurled brass screws.  If I decide I don’t like it, or I need the end of the bench for something, it comes off in a few seconds.

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If I do decide to keep it around, I’ll probably build something more aesthetically pleasing (dovetails, nice joinery, or whatnot). Just because. But for now, I can test the idea and decide which side of the controversy to come down on.

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Today’s music wasn’t… it was an audiobook reading of H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward”.

Go build something.

Ross Henton

January 2014

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A Tacky Solution

One thing that I’m absolutely guaranteed that I will not have when I really need one is a tack cloth.
I needed one today for the Mystery Project (more about that saga later). What I found was a dried-out tack cloth about the consistency of a chunk of cardboard, and about as useful. It wouldn’t even bend, much less collect dust.
But, fortunately, it’s salvageable. A half-teaspoon or so of water and turpentine each, knead it through, and let it sit in a container for a few minutes. Viola. good as new.

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This should not be misconstrued as an endorsement for Talenti Sicilian Pistachio Gelato. But, lord, it could be.

Ross Henton
January 2014

A Simple Test

If you’re filing something (like a piece of hardware, as seen here) and it seems to be taking longer than expected, shift farther down the file.

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Take short strokes as close to the handle as you can work. If it cuts better and faster, the file is worn out and should be replaced.
Seems obvious, doesn’t it? So why did I just waste ten minutes, when I should have checked last time I used it? Looks like I’m off to the store.

How (mildly) annoying.

Ross Henton
January 2014